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BETWEEN workout apps, fitness YouTube channels and social media profiles, a personal trainer is likely to have made it into your exercise routine, whether you paid for them or not. After all, why fork over £50 of your hard-earned cash for a trainer to yell “drop and give me 20”...

BETWEEN workout apps, fitness YouTube channels and social media profiles, a personal trainer is likely to have made it into your exercise routine, whether you paid for them or not.

After all, why fork over £50 of your hard-earned cash for a trainer to yell “drop and give me 20” when you can get Khloe Kardashian’s body sculptor Gunnar Peterson to do the same for free?

But while personal trainers are far more accessible to the masses than ever before, there’s very little that’s actually personal about them; and what works for Khloe (endless hours in the day to train and a full-sized gym in her basement) might not necessarily work for
you.

GHO Fitness is the new online food and fitness service aiming to bridge that gap, offering personalised food and fitness programmes delivered online to keep the costs down.

What is it?

GHO (Get Help On) Fitness does what it says on the tin. Founded by mates Sam Abbott and David Hogan, the programme aims to eliminate excuses like time, money and knowledge from people leading their healthiest lifestyle possible.

Users receive a personalised meal and fitness programme as well as access to the interactive dashboard where they can log their progress and chat to personal trainer David, who develops all the individual fitness regimes, or GHO’s resident nutritionist Molly Buszard, who devises each client’s weekly food plan.

How does it work?

Users complete a lifestyle form that gives the team all the information they need to create a bespoke dietary and fitness plan based on how, when and where you want to exercise, as well as your ability and lifestyle demands.

Every aspect is designed to make living a healthier lifestyle easier, from automatically-generated shopping lists based on your meal plan to instructional videos to ensure you’re getting the most from your workout.

“It’s not aimed at the elite sportsperson or gym junkie,” Sam explains.

We’re trying to reach someone who might be just starting out and feeling overwhelmed or perhaps someone who might have plateaued in their progress and aren’t sure how to move forward.”

The pair decided the best way to reach this group, is to make things as simple and accessible as possible.

“There are so many questions about nutrition and exercise, macros, carbohydrates… but we don’t want people checking the back of food packets. To make it easy, we just develop a calorie target based on their responses, and how to reach it through diet and exercise.”

What are the benefits?

Sam says the most important function of the GHO Fitness dashboard is its interactivity; users can ask questions about diet or fitness and receive a quick reply from either David or Molly themselves, rather than an automated chat function.

“We’re very responsive, and we always check in periodically so if someone has missed a couple of workouts we’re touching base to make sure they’re staying on track.

Even though we’re online, we’ve recognised that one of the things that makes personal trainers so effective is that motivation factor; they are there every step of the way and so are we.”

How much?

Usually £14.99 per month, but GHO is currently running an exclusive subscription offer for City Matters readers.
Simply enter the code: CITYMATTERS5 at the checkout to subscribe for £9.99. First payment will be taken after the 14-day free trial expires.

Where can I try it?

Visit ghofitness.com.

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