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More than 3,000 names of those who have died as a result of Covid-19 pandemic have been entered in the online book of remembrance since its launch on 22 May, St Paul’s Cathedral has announced. The Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral, the Very Reverend David Ison,...

More than 3,000 names of those who have died as a result of Covid-19 pandemic have been entered in the online book of remembrance since its launch on 22 May, St Paul’s Cathedral has announced.

The Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral, the Very Reverend David Ison, said: “We have been overwhelmed by the response to Remember Me.

“We were moved to start the project because so many people across the country were unable to say goodbye or mourn their loved ones in the usual ways.

“It has been incredibly moving to see the messages from family, friends and carers. It reminds us that every person who has died as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic is not merely a statistic in a health crisis – but a person, valued, missed and worthy of remembrance.”

St Paul’s set up Remember Me to enable families, friends and carers to record and mourn those who have died as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The book of remembrance is open to people of all faiths, beliefs or none.

Those wishing to remember loved ones can submit, free of charge, the name, photograph and a short message in honour of a deceased person via the Remember Me website. Remember Me will be open for entries for as long as needed.

The intention is for Remember Me site to become a physical memorial at St Paul’s Cathedral, subject to funding. The Cathedral has approved designs for a new inner porch in the North transept and this would serve as a fitting memorial for all who have died as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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