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Mark Field is a difficult man to tie down during election season, but it’s hard to argue with the methods of a man who is seeking a fifth straight victory at the polls on 8 June. Mr Field, who has occupied the Cities...

Mark Field is a difficult man to tie down during election season, but it’s hard to argue with the methods of a man who is seeking a fifth straight victory at the polls on 8 June.

Mr Field, who has occupied the Cities of London & Westminster seat on behalf of the Conservatives since 2001, has spent much of his recent time pounding the streets to connect with voters.

So busy is his schedule and dedication to make it a “high-five” of election triumphs, that the only days he hasn’t canvassed was to mark the recent attacks in Manchester and London.

Unsurprisingly, some familiar issues have greeted him out on local doorsteps, not least the deteriorating condition of London’s air – something which appears to have slipped under the radar as party leaders continue to take swipes at each other with fever pitch setting in.

“As the father of two young children, I understand the importance of clean, safe air not only at present but also for future generations.” said Mr Field.

“Poor air quality in central London is an issue that I have been raising in both the House and in the media for the past couple of years; it remains a topic that needs addressing urgently.”

“The government should look at a diesel scrappage scheme that reduces nitrogen dioxide emissions while also properly compensating those who bought diesel cars in good faith.”

Of course another contributing factor to the shift of focus away from the Capital’s environmental problems is Brexit.

Stuck between toeing the party line and staying true to his own beliefs, Mr Field admits plenty of work will be required to make sure the country – and the City he has represented for the past 16 years – comes out the other side of negotiations with a bright outlook.

“Brexit will be tough; I make no bones about this. Like the majority of the constituency, I voted to Remain. However, now that we are leaving the EU, I will do all I can to support Theresa May’s team in getting the best deal for the UK.”

Mr Field has described Conservative plans as “good-looking and bold”, but like most party manifestos, Mrs May’s blueprints have come under intense scrutiny, particularly surrounding costings – or the lack thereof.

Paramount to the City’s life after Brexit will be manageable operating costs, something that was a huge point of controversy at the beginning of the financial year when business rates soared. While out and about on his campaign Mr Field says he has made a special point of highlighting his work on behalf of businesses, both large and small.

“Supporting local businesses ahead of the 2017 business rates increase has been a priority of mine,” he insisted, pointing to a greater concerted effort with ministers to influence government proposals for a discretionary relief scheme.

“It is vital that we continue working to keep niche, independent retailers alive in central London so that it does not become a ‘clone’ city.

“I will continue to fight for those badly affected by the rates increase and to preserve the spirit and character of this unique constituency.”

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