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Amid the coronavirus outbreak, UK fitness enthusiasts are saving up to £90 a month on average whilst getting their fitness fix for free. Whilst the lockdown is bad news for the sports and leisure industry due to temporary closures, many Brits will save large sums during the isolation period. A study...

Amid the coronavirus outbreak, UK fitness enthusiasts are saving up to £90 a month on average whilst getting their fitness fix for free.

Whilst the lockdown is bad news for the sports and leisure industry due to temporary closures, many Brits will save large sums during the isolation period.

A study has found that the average gym membership in the UK comes in at £40, and the UK average cost of a personal training session is £50.

Following stricter social distancing and self-isolation measures implemented by the British government on 23 March, gyms up and down the country froze member’s direct debit payments.

Fitness fanatics are now enjoying no financial expenditure as they are turning to free live-streamed classes on YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram to keep themselves, and their bank balance healthy.

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A spokesperson for researchers The Money Pig said: “Technology is helping to alleviate some of the pressure health and fitness businesses are currently dealing with.

“Through a smartphone or computer, Brits can work out in the comfort of their own home making a saving of up to £90 per month.

“The great thing about free guided workouts for everyone is that you can do as much as you like, when you like, and spend what you like.

“How much money Brits save depends on how much exercise they do a month. If they have one personal training session a week that’s up to £240 per month saved.

“Joe Wicks is doing free 30 minutes personal training PE workouts daily. If you do this every weekday and just take the average cost for 30 mins PT session, you’re in theory saving £125 a week.”

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