THE Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red art installation at the Tower of London in 2014 remains one of the most poignant Great War commemorations ever...

THE Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red art installation at the Tower of London in 2014 remains one of the most poignant Great War commemorations ever devised.

And now, having sold each of the 888,246 ceramic poppies to raise funds for Armed Forces charities, one campaign is asking: Where Are The Poppies Now? The project, part of the First World War arts initiative 14-18 Now, is inviting members of the public in possession of a poppy to pin their location and describe exactly what it means to own one of the unique flowers, which sold for £25 each three years ago. The whereabouts of each flower is then loaded on to a digital map, with logs having already been made from as far a field as the USA and the Netherlands.

A spokesperson from 14-18 Now said: “We’re inviting all poppy owners around the world to plant their poppy to our digital map and share the story of why or for whom they bought them.

“From today and over the coming months you can discover the stories of poppy owners around the world on our map. See how far the poppies have travelled as well as those planted in your local area.”

Each poppy represents the life of a British soldier lost in combat during the Great War; the sweeping display originally created by artist Paul Cummins attracted huge crowds during its three-month residency at the City’s iconic landmark.

Poppy owners can take part by visiting wherearethepoppiesnow.org.uk.

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